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Measurement

Knowledge base & tools to develop mathematical literacy

Knowledge base

The mathematical knowledge base includes concepts necessary for learners to conceptualize to become mathemtically literate and misconceptions that must be over come. Particularly important for measurement include:

Information on the development of literacy in measurement & tools to achieve it (pedagogy)

 

First standard weights across Eurasia

Activities to facilitate algebra, patterns, & functions literacy

  • Metric fact sheet - Fact sheet vwith metric units: meter, liter, gram, prefixes on a number line, diagram of dust particle & human hair, metric prefixes with symbols to + & - powers of thirty.
  • 21 Centimeter card game: make a deck with 45 cards. Draw a slanted straight line, the following lengths, on each card. Slant the lines on each card at different degrees. Make:
    • 4 - 1 cm,
    • 4 - 2 cm,
    • 4 - 3 cm,
    • 4 - 4cm,
    • 4 - 5 cm,
    • 5 - 6 cm,
    • 5 - 7cm,
    • 5 - 8 cm,
    • 5 - 9 cm, &
    • 5 - 10cm.
      Game play: Deal three cards to each player and play like 21. Player that line lengths add closest to 21 cm, without going over is the winner. After the deal each player can choose to be dealt another card or hold. Player closest to 21 cm, with out going over wins. Winner measures each card with a cm ruler to verify their score.
      Alternative version: Play as above and record the lengths of their cards, if they don't go over 21. First player to 121 wins.
  • Linear & volume -
  • Temperature How does temperature in centigrade Celsius compare to temperature in Fahrenheit? Facts: Water freezes at 32 degrees Fahrenheit and 0 degrees Celsius. Water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit and 100 degrees Celsius. Find a thermometer that has both scales and read from one scale to the other. C = (F - 32) * 5/9; C = (F - 32) / 9/5; F = (C * 9/5) + 32 Verify or prove the formulas.
  • Money - Sequence of outcomes to develop with activities to learn to count change:
    • Know people use money to buy goods and services.
    • Sort money by its appearance.
    • Draw pictures of coins and paper money.
    • Select coins on their desk (penny, quarters, dimes and nickel) as called.
    • Identify and state the values of money (penny = 1 cent , quarter = 25 cents, dime = 10 cents, nickel = 5 cents, ... ).
    • Sort money by its value.
    • Order money by its value.
    • Recognize different coins can have similar values.
    • Represent coins and their values: draw a circle for each coin (penny, quarter, dime, nickel) with the value inside: (25, 25, 10, 10, 5).
    • Identify a coin, its value, and point to its value represented on a number dot sequence, trail, or line. Select a second coin. Identify the coin, its value, and show how to add and represent its value and sum of both.
    • Identify a coin, its value, and point to its value represented on a labeled hundreds chart. Select a second coin. Identify the coin, its value, and show how to add and represent its value and sum of both. Draw an arrow from 1 to the value of the first coin. Circle the value and draw an arrow for the value of the next coin and circle the sum. (arrow math)
    • Use arrow math and a labeled hundreds chart chart to solve coin problems with two addends.
    • Use arrow math and a labeled hundreds chart chart to solve coin problems with more than two addends.
    • Given an assorted collection of coins (that add to less than 100 cents), Use arrow math and a labeled hundreds chart chart to solve coin problems with more than two addends.
    • Identify different orders to count change more efficiently. (Start with the largest coins, group similar coins, group by easy numbers (10, 50, 100, & 25).
    • Repeat the above procedures on a blank hundreds chart.
    • Repeat the above procedures with paper money.

Can use the counting money strategy for counting decimal numbers. Write the starting value (1.89), select a count (.01), write it, write the sum (1.90), write the next coin (.10), then the sum (2.00), and continue as before.

 

Measurement is never exact.

It is only as accurate as who and with what is doing the measurement.